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from now 10:00 p.m. eastern. piers morgan starts right now. >> tonight the top five things that america is talking about. number one, peace love and mutual understanding. >> we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> it is me. >> bob costas, did he cross the line. >> and the most outrageous royal prank over. >> hello there. could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> this is piers more dpgan ton. good evening. our big story tonight from what every one is talking about. the royal prank called heard around the world. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fall out of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more effective controls on the sale of guns. >> roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a background check for purchasing. i don't see in anyone should be able to purchase military style or bod
the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a commanding view of the massachusetts landscape and sea scape. far from espousing individual liberty, hancock and his fellow merchants in new england, governed their businesses and communities with economic ruthlessness that often left their competitors homeless and penniless. like today's tea party movement, the colonial tea party had almost nothing to do with tea. tea was nothing more than a social beverage for wealthy women. men seldom draping it, and it ranked below ail and rum among beverages americans consumed most. the tea party movement that sparked the american revolution actually began 20 years earlier in the 1750s and 1760s when new england business leaders like today's tea party supported a costly government war, but refused to pay higher taxes to cover the cost of that war. the war had started i
at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by the way. >> that by the way is how the chinese would describe any relationship between japan and america. the interesting aspect of all these conflicts is that as india and china and india and china have a proximate geographically, but we've never been neighbors. >> right. >> in order to be neighbors you either have to love each other or hate each other. we have done neither. in fact, in 1962 during the first strategic conflict, between these two, you have to understand, it's hard to understand why we are not neighbors. [inaudible] in terms of inaccessible. but the positions, the lines, the strategies, the lines, what would they resonate to? the positions that are taken by postcolonial nations is that we will not be bound by decisions made by colonial powers. one, or in china's case, that we had to abandon our national positions. and now that we are strong, we need to resurrect them. right or wrong is not, that is very little to do w
>>> tonight, the top five things that america is talking about. number one, peace love and mutual understanding. yeah, right. not in washington. >> i won't play that game. >> we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> it is me. >> number three, bob costas. did he cross the line? number five, the most outrageous royal prank ever. >> hello there. could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> this is piers morgan tonight. good evening. our big story tonight from what every one is talking about. washington's high-stakes game of "let's make a deal," to the royal prank called heard around the world. to bob costas talking about guns. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. abbe huntsman, and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fallout of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher and his girlfriend. bob costas of nbc spoke out about this. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more comprehensive and effe
in pakistan this year while drastically increasing in yemen. according to the new america foundation, confirmed drone attacks fell to 46 from 72 in pakistan, while rising to 53 from 18 in yemen. the u.s. just recently admitted responsibility for a september attack in yemen that killed 11 civilians, including three children. rebels of the central african republic appeared to be on the verge of seizing control of the capital after taking at least 10 other towns. central african republic and president has urged foreign intervention from the u.s. and france to help him push back the rebel advance. the u.s. says it is a pact with its embassy as a precautionary safety measure. in india, a 17-year-old girl was gang raped has committed suicide after being pressured by police to drop the case and marry one of her attackers. the girl's death comes amidst growing national outrage over a spate of gang rapes ignored by india's police, including one on a public bus in delhi. on thursday, protests against rape in india continued nationwide. >> they are doing nothing about it. [indiscernible] it is
. that would be my big request like everybody else. get america's finances under control and that will take both parties. it will take taxes and it will take reduction in commitments that have been made. it now can be validated. let's get this but do it in a way that exacerbates the uncertain economy. the second -- we have to happen through innovation. whether it is the space program or tax credits for renewable energy. all that is important. we have to keep that going. that will get hard because we will face is demographics. that is my 74th birthday on april 7. i am aware of the and aging population which i have become and we are an aging population relative to what we were. luckily, we have millions of fresh arrivals that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader o
by securing america's future energy, this is about an hour-and-a-half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the energy security leadership council for being with us today. they have been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we are nothing without their credibility as the great ceo's, an entrepreneur, and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special>> i want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. we stand on the shoulders and the time it takes to get these reports. the policy staff, james, leslie, the staff that puts these together, our political staff and the rest of the team at safe. we're seeing more production than we have ever seen before. the most production in the last couple of decades of year on year growth. oil imports are falling. the demand for oil continues to decline based on fuel economy standards and other reasons. we still continue to have a problem. the report we are releasing today and the subtitle says it all. harnessing american resour
that have made america a beacon of hope and freedom. many yearn for basic human liberties. the people of western sa harrah have been trapped in oppressive conditions under the puppet regime. the front has instituted masked kidnappings of people from their homes into western algeria. they have been in prison in camps for 35 years. the front colbrates with the likes of cuba who ration food in the camp and indoctor rin ate children while partnering with al qaeda. they have a plan, which i will submit for the record that addresses these issues with a clear and democratic solution to the sa harrah crisis. this is where america support should lie. mr. speaker, the united states can and must continue to advance fundamental human rights as we in this chamber continue to work together for peace, justice and human dignity in the western sahara. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. are there further requests for one-minute speeches? the house will be in order. members and staff, remove your conversations off the floor. under the speaker's announced policy o
that -- formula ever in the history of america -- economics that more american energy equals more american jobs, i don't know what it is. it is all the jobs you have if you of a reliable supply of energy. the front page of the "the wall street journal" indicates a difficulty of connecting this cheap product we have in natural gas. we thought we would run out natural-gas as a country. connecting this cheap product with a more expensive market and getting it overseas. if we could become energy self- sufficient, that does not mean we would not buy on the world market, but if we could meet our needs in the north american markets, almost all of that money comes back to us. we have no better trading partner than canada. nafta has increased the trading capacity of mexico. it has gone somewhere from the 40% range and a growing and, -- 57 neighborhood to the high 40's to the mid-70s's now, and they are quickly catching up with canada. when you buy energy in north america, they give you the money back. that was a lot to solve the problems. if you make your position better as a nation, suddenly, your numbers
] love america! - [crying] [typewriter clacking] [ding!] from comedy central's world news headquarters in new york, this is the "daily show" with jon stewart ( cheers and applause ) >> jon: welcome to the "daily show." what a good one we have for you tonight. my name is jon stewart. our guest tonight, alan simpson-- one-third of the singing trio "ashford and simpson and bowles" ( laughter ) you should not get their album. they're not very good. let's begin tonight with america. it's great! and republicans in the united states senate think it's about time america cafta, side it's famed humility and let the world see the awesomeness that is us. >> the nation and the world need strong american leadership. >> we need to continue to lead the world. >> we wanted our example to inspire the people of the earth. >> they're waiting for america to lead the way. >> we are as a nation a beacon of hope for many across the globe. >> we've created a beacon of hope and opportunity for the rest of the world. >> jon: a beacon of hope. a home beacon, a-- come on, world! follow our leadership. did you he
. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some point they no such thing as a debt crisis. manage to gain control of the balloon and lower it above a farm. the farmer comes out and looks up at the balloon and one of the balloonists says, excuse me, sir, where are we? and the farmer says, you are in a balloon. the balloonist says, he must be an economist. precisely accurate, and hopelessly useless. [laughter] we have a doctor here amongst us. imagine if you had a terrible case of a cancer patient in acute pain, and your diagnosis was, the person is experiencing a pain crisis. it wouldn't be useful. debt is a symptom of 2008, to be precise. it is what happens when a financial implosion begins on wall street, and then all sorts of dark forces break out, break loose, and they start dismantling the economic and social fabric of the world. these awful events happen once every hundred years
that group selection is the reason for human evolution. steve cole, president of the new america foundation, investigates the power and global influence of exxonmobil in "private empire: exxonmobil and american power." for an extended list of ligs to 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> booktv continues now with diana furchtgott-roth. she takes a look at president obama's green jobs initiative and argues that it hurts the economy. this is about 40 minutes. >> good afternoon. i'm howard, vice president for policy research at the manhattan institute. thanks so much for joining us. the question of of whether and how government, particularly the federal government, directs tax dollars to specific industries was a discussion in last night's presidential debate, and can it's become an important and ongoing theme in the current presidential campaign. the terms on which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have also been the focus of intense debate, but probably the most contentious example of all is the one o
. >>> also, let me tell you about the biggest success story in latin america. it is not brazil. it's actually much closer to home. then, as the world watches the arab world struggle with democracy, we'll take a look at the problem from an unusual perspective, upside down. how does a country turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i'll talk to pulitzer-prize winning historian ann applebalm. we focus on decision making. in the depths of the financial crisis, the obama administration had an almost impossible choice -- save chrysler by injecting billions of taxpayer dollars, or let it fail and lose perhaps a million jobs. car czar steve rattner gives us a fascinating inside look. for viewers in the united states, we have a special tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific called "tough decisions." >>> but, first, here's my take. announcing that he would send proposals on reducing gun violence in america to congress, president obama this week mentioned a number of sensible gun control measures. but he also paid homage to the washington conventional wisdom about the ma
revenue. there are various ways to can do that. we are a high-cost state. america is a holocaust -- a high-cost country. that is why, that is the way the world this. we're 4% of the world. an aging 4% with an emerging from a powerful china and india and brazil and other countries. we have to be smart to be competitive by lowering people's wages for reducing various benefits, that is problematic. the ceo's do not say you have to reduce my salary. what about for the secretary or the janitor, the person at the front desk, or the computer pro career? we have a balance here. you pull over here and push over there. we will do our best and we cannot always beat texas. you can go to arizona and do your work out of there. a lot of people still move to silicon valley because of the synergy of so many bright people. if you can get the right people, get that cleaned up so we can bring smart people here and keep them here, we will keep adopting the game. [applause] >> governor hickenlooper, this is your chance. you have here a room full of silicon valley executives. what do you say to them to get them
. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i'm kathy kaye. supporters and opponents in egypt of president morsi fight outside the palace in cairo. villages are flattened and hundreds are killed. and remembering the legendary jazzd of dave brubeck, pianist whose impact went far beyond the world of music. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. in egypt tonight, pitched battles on the streets of cairo and -- between supporters and opponents of the president there. there have been violent clashes for the second day outside the presidential power us -- palace in cairo. demonstrators have been during petrol bombs. four senior advisers have resigned. what are the chances for a peaceful resolution? that is the question i asked the state department spokesman p.j. crowley. >> we have had the former head of the iaea suggesting that morsi is now worse than hosni mubarak. is getting quite tense there, isn't it? >> it is. and the tension between institutions is actu
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i'm kathy kaye. supporters and opponents in egypt of president morsi fight outside the palace in cairo. villages are flattened and hundreds are killed. and remembering the legendary sound of dave brubeck, a jazz pianist whose impact went far beyond the world of music. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. in egypt tonight, pitched battles on the streets of cairo and -- between supporters and opponents of the president there. there have been violent clashes for the second day out
percentage points. bank of america is the biggest gainer hitting a 52-week high. david: energy stocks rising as oil climbed about $0.37 to settle above the $87 mark. energy sh giants chevron and coo ending in the plus. liz: consumer names getting a boost. adding time warner, walgreens, we just spoke, this is of course a consumer staple that people have loved along with names of her shoes. gettinhitting repetitive 52-week highs. david: apple, the ceo says he has a responsibility to create jobs, but how about creating shareholder value, where should the focus be after two months of a 25% loss of share value, should that be the target of tim cook and apple? liz: this is a huge crane maker and a food company have a great year, the stock up 70% thanks in part to having his hands in the cranes and food services part. he is going to be joining us exclusively this hour. here's why you have listened to him. is he keeping up pace in the new year and what part of his business is doing better. david: we have a very busy hour coming up, but what drove the market with the "data download." stocks pushing h
money" starts right now. >>> just days to go before america goes over a fiscal cliff. an outcomeloing more likely every hour. washington's willingness to take america to the brink threatens its prosperity. this is about the latest movement in the negotiation between the democrats and republicans comes down to useless symbolic moves and haggling between grown men. your elected officials are wasting time while the clock ticks. house speaker john boehner announced his plan b to let bush-era tax cuts expire for earners making more than $1 million a year and he wants to set automatic spending cuts with unspecified cuts elsewhere. the speaker pulled his so-called plan b for lack of support from his own party because many republicans still beholden to grover nor quest and the ridiculous pledge want no compromise at all. the debate between the two sides centers around a balanced approach the budget. republicans say president obama wants too much revenue. that's taxes in normal speak and not enough cuts. >> at some point we're going to have to address the spending problem that we have. we can'
to america. right now china is the leading country. russia is certainly in the top 5 with over 700,000 orphans in that country. there's certainly plenty of children who need a loving family here in the united states. >> suarez: how about that side of the story. unicef estimate there is's only about 18,000 russian families looking to adopt children. that's a disproportionate number considering the need for new homes. >> it is. last year alone here in america there were a thousand children adopted from russia. there are many american families, many of whom right now are in the process of adopting these children that are willing, ready, and able to adopt these kids, some of which have severe special needs. so it speaks to the heart of these american families that are willing to adopt these kids and bring them home. the. >> suarez: but there have been unfortunate stories that have gotten a lot of attention here in the united states and back in russia >> does that make things more difficult for your organization and others that are watching international adoptions? >> sure, well, i thin
-founder of america online. is a rabid twitter. i feel like i know every detail of your life. and a relentless of entrepreneurship. we're very fortunate to have these three panelistings. they get five to seven minutes -- there will be a little time left. five to seven minutes to discuss the topic and we're going have a discussion among us then we will open it up to you and hopefully, we will get to all of your comments and questions. >> i'm delighted to be here this evening because i think the topics is important. this conference also recognizes mark kaplan who is that i am pleased to speak in behalf of tonight. we're looking tonight at immigration policies and how they affect our eighty to attract high-skilled immigrants. engineers and entrepreneurs who contribute to innovation. because universities and colleges are in the talent business. we're in a global competition for talent. all yustses, but particularly research university, are competing to get the best and brightest. if immigration policies make it differently for international students to come to the united states then we undercut ou
the average life span was almost 40. 50 years later, 47. by 1950, it was up to 68. now, the average in america is 78. 76 for men and 81 for women. the numbers will only go up. and up. the. >> their of a book called "100 plus, the coming age of longevity will change everything." everything? >>guest: everything. >> how much longevity? >>guest: i take the premise it will be possible in for average life expectancy to go up to 150. >> there is someone alive today who will live to be 150? >>guest: absolutely. >> is that creepy? you will be shriveled? >>guest: no, we will be healthier for longer, and energetic and enjoying likes. >> because they invent body part replacements. >>guest: that is a low-hanging fruits. scientists have created brand new humoring begans using a person's adult stem cells so bladders, trachea, human blood vessels, they have been created already. >> so, assume we accept this, we are healthy, what happens to your life? you work longer? you change jobs? don't you get sick of it? >>guest: the exiting is, there will be much more opportunity. right now, with the average life span o
. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. (instrumental music) >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring america's to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by credit suisse, eni, the hurford foundation and pricewaterhousecoopers llp. >> coming up next, sacred cow: defending america on a budget. (instrumental music) (marching music) >> the u.s. spent the last century fighting well-defined wars against well-heeled enemies. ♪ stop! >> duck and cover up under the table. first you duck and then you cover. >> but the fall of the berlin wall meant the collapse of the traditional enemy and the military struggled to find its purpose in this post soviet world. >> we have to understand the role that the united states has played since the end of the second world war and
taken america by storm. what's the deal with his venomous anti-american rant? psy, now apologizing. but should he still be allowed to perform for the president? >>> and secret santa. a boy photographed on santa's lap, making his christmas wish. find out why it took more than a decade for santa to deliver. it's a christmas tale with a sweet, surprising twist. ♪ santa claus is coming >>> hey, everybody. good morning. we have a big morning. including at some point this morning, the normally health-conscious bianna golodryga and ginger zee, are going to personally taste test what is allegedly the most expensive burger on the planet earth. ron and i normally do the taste testing around here. we're very excited about this. >>> also, check this out. the flying squirrel in the house this morning. gabrielle douglas is here. she's here live. she has a new memoir out, where she says she almost quit right before the olympics. she's going to be taking questions from a whole gaggle of young fans. very much looking forward to that. >> so many people excited to meet her this morning. >>> also, c
coming up after 2:00 p.m. >>> one of the biggest gun retailers in america says it did a lot of soul searching after the newtown massacre. but in the end, customers wanted guns. >>> in the 3:00 hour, we'll take a closer look at how other countries view america's fascination with guns including japan where almost no one owns firearms. >>> and it's that time of the year when everyone gets sick. at 4:00 p.m., doctor sanjay gupta will explain how to avoid getting the flu. your money starts right now. >>> just days to go before america goes over a fiscal cliff. an outcome looking more likely every hour. washington's willingness to take america to the brink threatens its prosperity. i'm ali velshi. this is "your money." the latest negotiations comes down to useless symbolic moves and haggling between grown men. put bluntly, your elected officials are wasting time while the clock ticks. house speaker john boehner announced his plan b to let bush-era tax cuts expire for earners making more than a million dollars a year. and he wants to replace automatic cuts in defense spending set to start
. welcome to tax eeerything america. good morning, everyone. income, dividend, interest, deductions, all financial transactions, granny's new hip, your mortgage interest. as we start the week it's all about raising taxes not cutting spending. tax everything. but there are rich people who will avoid the obama tax increases the board of directors at costco will get a huge tax windfall by paying themselves a big dividend this year. and jim senegal, charlie monger, bill gates' father all on the board in favor of taxing the rich, really? and the debate on guns front and center. that murder-suicide involving the kansas city linebacker brings on the call for gun control and the possibility of head injuries in football and drugs and alcohol. all right, everybody, monday morning, "varney & company" about to begin. [ male announcer ] this is steve. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba ding the great rrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the marke he goes with people he trus, which ishy he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry
to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. in egypt tonight, pitched battles on the streets of cairo and -- between supporters and opponents of the president there. there have been violent clashes for the second day outside the presidential power us -- palace in cairo. demonstrators have been during petrol bombs. four senior advisers have resigned. what are the chances for a peaceful resolution? that is the question i asked the state department spokesman p.j. crowley. >> we have had the former head of the iaea suggesting that morsi is now worse than hosni mubarak. is getting quite tense there, isn't it? >> it is. and the tension between institutions is actually potentially constructive. and every faction is sending their groups into the streets, or the muslim brotherhood is sending dogs to intimidate the court. this could create a very tense situation and potentially spiral out of control. >> how accurate are those comments about morsi? >> we do not know yet. none of those statements necessarily mean there is anything other than competition. you have t
be from india when i talk i sound like i'm from america. my parents are from india but i was born in america and i started this dance when i was 18. i was not a baby e. both charlotte and an drea did as well. charlotte at 15 years and joe airna and i 15 years. that's how we got in this program. we practiced very hard. very, very hard we practiced everyday and we have been been in india practicing 8 times where our teacher is from. yes. >> yes. >> well there are similarities all of southeast asia. we performed in bali with a group. it's a story from the [inaudible] and so the indian epiics actually the indian epiics for very common in cambodia and bali and thailand and there is a different aesthetic. all southeast asia and asia there are a lot of similarities. >> he is a male entity. he is not -- are you referring to the story? >> it's interesting you should say that. a unique indian concept is one of half male, half female. and that is -- unlike some dances the solo dancer portrays all of the parts in the story. you can portray a feminine aspect and then masculine aspect with
, trying to make a product in america? >> governor, i never miss a marketing opportunity. on my way in i can't help, but notice a lot of steel is mid in my company. steel that moves your lights and books and underneath the audience. >> i have paper out there. be careful out there audience. >> it's all made by companies like mine. our product is a qualities product. it's the same as sold in china and india. it's a big difference, the question is how does a company like mine compete in a global environment where china, india and europe are on our shore. >> they're having government subsidies to chinese products so they can put guys like you out of business and that's what a lot of americans don't understand. it's frustrating to me, that's correct. but there's probably a lore important point about the product and that is that our government is making it difficult for us compete. and the tax policy, president obama is telling small business people like myself, he's going to help out by raising taxes. . the only way is to invest in equipment and fuel costs the same, electricity costs the same
:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the leadership council that could be with us here today. they've been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we're nothing without their credibility as the great c.e.o.'s, entrepreneurs and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. really we stand on their shoulders, all of us, and the hard work that they -- and the time that they spent to put these reports in conjunction with the energy security leadership council, the policy staff, jonna hamilton, jame
are getting wealthy like the united states of america. the united states decided to catch up now austria and new zealand now they are on top pushing forward but the rest of the world that is dominated but from the '60s you have small families and then the economy is good. they are catching up. then 2010 they borrow money to the richest. john: this raises to amazing results. thousands of years of human history. and everybody was stock in the lower left over thousands of years. this is just hundreds of years why are some countries still stock? >> this is the condo with the best messagest moste african countries have fast economic growth. their ideas of 20 years ago they have a better education event to antonia from 1970 to. so we can see the african john: this is wonderful. now we will all be rich. >> now at his $2 million not because they are stupid. allport people are clever or they would be dead. john: they have no love lost. >> no. or excessive credit but locked into a vicious circle of poverty. it takes a small investment to get them now.g with the young couple decides to grab the co
: but this is a historic reversal. look i've been in america 40 years and started out in san francisco 40 years ago and back in those days, there was always a net migration into california, significant numbers. california gained tens of millions of people over my time in america, but that just recently has been completely reversed. now there's a net leaving of people. and that's historic in america, that's historic. >> it is historic. it is historic because you come here, as i said for the weather, but that's it anymore and there's no promise of a future. don't promise that you're going to be able to put down your stake and really do something with it. look at the head of facebook, one of the partners left not only the state of california, left the united states of america because of the taxes going on in this state and in the united states of america itself. so, again, there's no incentive to stay in the state because you were so punished, if in fact you do have the state. if you're a young couple trying to raise a family into the public school system and the public school system is in the tank an
that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [laughter] let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific eventsome. >> yes. [applause] >> let's also t
there is a great middle out there that makes of america. the more we reflect the middle, the better off our committee will be and i think the service we provide will be better. >> what gives you that hope? >> a lot of people are recognizing the pathway we are on will not help. more and more members are talking with me where we discuss with one another how we can improve the place. i hear it almost every day. i encourage it. >> there are people who believe partisanship is a good thing because ideology and the direction of the country moves in the way they want. for example, people have come in with the tea party. what do you think of these hyper-partisan groups outside of the congress that attempt to exert their influence? >> one of the more fascinating experience i have had involves a gathering. my first meeting a couple years ago, with tea party types. my staff was concerned about this new group. i said, give me their telephone numbers. i invited them to our session. they were there that evening to express their concern about health care being nationalized and taking over that piece of the
are looking at two casino stocks, looking at america, and -- liz: mohawk hitting an 52 week high, a ceramic manufacturer, getting a boost from the housing market. >> making this purchase under way, like mohawk and we are having a winning week on wall street, feels like a terrible day but it is not that bad. liz: they were having a great week. dave: they end on a bad note. >> 110 fresher. dave: let's look at how everything is working out, we see all indices and the dow is down significantly, triple digits to the downside but recovering a little bit as we go to the end of the trading day and the trading week, it was down 3% last night, the futures were down when they looked at the collapse of plan b from john boehner it has improved dramatically but you can't put too much lipstick on this, a bad day on the markets and the s&p down more than the dow. and nasdaq the big loser down almost 1%, russell 2,000 not too bad, down 1/2%. liz: you might be ready to hop on planes, trains and automobiles the travel stocks not moving quickly, they're underperforming on one of the busiest travel days of the
that are going to hit america in the gut. i think impact would be really strong. if anybody thinks this is going to be a slope better wake up. >> ifill: the link between brain injury and sports, new evidence ties repeated blows to the head to long-term damage. we take a look. >> brown: ray suarez looks at the firestorm over israel's announcement it will expand settlements in the west bank. >> ifill: elizabeth brackett looks at how one chicago school is dealing with the transition to new state-wide standards. >> i really did find that the kids do understand more, and they learn more. they're more interested in what they're learning. >> brown: plus, as global carbon dioxide levels hit record highs, we analyze the increasing difficulty of combating climate change, with carol davenport of the "national journal." >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financi
. this is not the first time these things that happened. it happened in the united states of america. you have disparate economies in the united states of america that are bound together monetarily. missouri and washington state are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great expression in the 1930 -- you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee
and middle class. life will go on. just like life has gone on for the rest of the united states of america. but right now, i think the state of politics is very sad because they're seen -- there seems to be more of a game to be played and positions, one party having the upper hand over the other. not much is going to get done. and you have too many extremes on each side to make things a lot more difficult to run. and it makes it difficult on the president as well. i'm optimistic that the president got reelected, but pessimistic on anything really changing. have leased, anytime soon. -- at least, any time soon. host: and talking about actual change, if there will be a difference on january 1st or otherwise, in terms of taxes, politics, the fiscal cliff, john mckinnon, are any of these expiring? as part of our fiscal cliff series, we're looking at the bush tax cuts that are set to expire unless congress acts, and we are looking at spending cuts. our deductions on the chopping block unless congress acts? are they floating through unless they get rid of them? guest: by and large, most of them
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